Author: kimberly b

Technical tips for using Clocktree

Technical tips for using Clocktree

Clocktree telehealth is web based and should work on any modern computer or mobile device with a camera. Access Clocktree via browser, no matter what device you are using.  Preferred browsers are:

  • PC (Windows): Google Chrome
  • Android tablet or phone: Google Chrome
  • Mac (Desktop or laptop): Google Chrome or Safari
  • iPhone or iPad: Safari

In many cases, Clocktree will work on other browsers such as Edge or Firefox, however we recommend Chrome or Safari for the most reliable video and audio connection.

It’s also important that both ends of the video call have sufficient internet speed. You can test your internet speed at www.speedtest.net  This gives you three speed metrics for ping, download and upload. The upload speed is the most crucial for video conferencing and it should be above 5 Mbps for a good connection.

Some tips for maximizing your internet speed are:

  1. Connect your computer to the router via ethernet cable, as opposed to WiFi, if possible.
  2. If using WiFi, position yourself as close as possible to your router.
  3. Avoid streaming content from the internet on other devices connected to your network – you share bandwidth so let your Clocktree connection use all of it!
  4. Restart your computer right before your Clocktree session and don’t open other software or apps that might use internet or processing power in the background.

And finally, make sure your camera and microphone are functional and check your lighting and background prior to a video call.  To do this, log in to your Clocktree account and select Test Audio/Video.

As always, contact our Customer Care team at 302-990-8935 or support@clocktree.com if you need any help!

Teletherapy is closing the provider gap in rural North Dakota

Teletherapy is closing the provider gap in rural North Dakota

There is a nationwide shortage of mental health services, but this shortage is even more pronounced in rural states like North Dakota. In response to the shortage, the state has boosted telemedicine as an option for mental health care.

The ND human services agency has started allowing providers who serve patients through its health centers to live in some of the state’s bigger cities — or even move out of state — and deliver mental health care to rural areas through video calls.

Expanding telemedicine has given North Dakota a way to reach more patients — and convince more psychiatrists to practice in the state. It’s helped them reach more patients in rural areas and those who can’t travel far for mental health care, including the elderly.

“We’ve definitely seen a significant impact on that recruitment and retention,” said Dr. Laura Kroetsch, of the North Dakota human services department. There are 22 psychiatrists who provide telemedicine care through the department’s eight clinics. Another three psychiatrists live out of state and provide telemedicine to those health centers. In December 2018, the department’s psychiatrists provided nearly 500 telemedicine appointments — more than 150 of which were with psychiatrists who live out of state

The state is also trying to prepare the next generation of psychiatrists to provide telemedicine to underserved areas. Once a week, psychiatry residents training at the University of North Dakota treat rural residents across the state by video chat.

Read the article “North Dakota doesn’t have enough psychiatrists. Telemedicine is helping to fix that” on Stat.com to learn more about North Dakota’s plan to expand telemedicine for mental health services.

WA state legislature passes two telehealth bills

WA state legislature passes two telehealth bills

Washington state lawmakers have passed two new bills which help expand telehealth services state wide.  The first, HB5386, will establish a telemedicine training program covering issues such as licensing, liability, informed consent, and training on how to use technology.  Telehealth providers would be required to complete this certification every four years. If signed into law, WA would be the first state to implement and mandate a telemedicine training program.

The second bill, HB5387, would enable healthcare providers using telemedicine to extend the physician’s privileges to the health system in which the patient is located, provided both locations agree to the service.

Both bills were submitted by State Sen. Randi Becker, who said ““This is a first in the nation, this training program that we’re putting in place along with the ease of credentialing for providers providing services through telemedicine. These are phenomenal improvements to our health care system.”

The bills have been sent to Gov. Jay Inslee for signature. Read more at mHealthIntelligence.

 

National study of insurance claims shows 53% increase for telehealth in 2017

US News just released a summary of a study done by FAIR Health which looked at telehealth trends based on insurance claims in the year 2017.   Here are some of the highlights:

  • In the single year from 2016 to 2017, telehealth usage as measured by claim lines grew 53 percent – a rate greater than for any of the other venues of care studied.
  • Telehealth has been growing more rapidly in urban areas than in rural areas. The rural increase in telehealth claim lines from 2012 to 2017 was 482 percent, compared with an increase in urban areas of 1,289 percent. From 2016 to 2017, rural growth was 29 percent and urban growth 55 percent.

chart

  • In 2017, the top five states for telehealth claim lines as a percentage of all medical claim lines were Oklahoma, Wyoming, Ohio, Hawaii and West Virginia, in order from most to least. None of those states were among the top five in 2016
  • The bottom five states in 2017 for telehealth claim lines as a percentage of all medical claim lines, in order from least to most, were New Jersey, Rhode Island, Nebraska, Connecticut and South Dakota.
  • Telehealth was most associated with individuals ages 31 to 60, who accounted for 44 percent of the reimbursement claims  in 2017.